Hidden Agenda

Book by Roberto Giobbi (£36.00 - normally £45.00)

In stock. Dispatched from the UK within 3 days

That Roberto Giobbi is one of the preeminent authors in magic is well established. The Card College series secured Mr. Giobbi's place in magic's history. But for many, his boldest and most fascinating book is Secret Agenda, a collection filled with wisdom, advice, secrets, and fantastic tricks, all delivered in a "calendar" of magic, one amazing secret per day. It was the first of its kind, and a modern classic. Magic fans rejoice: we are pleased to announce a new collection, a spiritual "sequel." Hidden Agenda has arrived.

Hidden Agenda contains 366 entries. Many readers will enjoy digesting one secret per day, while others will find it too difficult to stop turning the pages at each sitting. Topics range from clever deck switches to meditations on how to define the word "magic," but each day of Hidden Agenda will bring a revelation of some kind. There are more photos and trick content in Hidden Agenda than the previous volume, and all the material described is as-yet unpublished. If you are a fan of Roberto Giobbi or magic in general, this handsome hardback volume (414 pages) is a must.

Just a few of the 366 entries:

  • Gambling Stories
  • Skinner on Marlo's Poker Deal
  • Seven Secrets of Life
  • Idea for a Bill Routine
  • Hofzinser's Glove
  • Card in Balloon for Table Workers
  • The Kaps Turn
  • Management for the Palm
  • Advice for the Young
  • Linear Solutions
  • Carte Blanche Prediction
  • An Extraordinary Ability

Just in time for the holiday season, this is the end-of-year release the industry has been waiting for. End the year with a pledge to use Hidden Agenda every day next year.

414 pages in decorated hardcover binding, designed to sit perfectly alongside Secret Agenda on your bookshelf.

Hidden Agenda by Roberto Giobbi book
 

Interested in Hidden Agenda? You may also like:

 
Write a review

Customer reviews for Hidden Agenda

Any book by Roberto Giobbi is a treat. If he had only produced the Card College series he would be assured of a place in magic history, but he has written so much more, including the “lighter” Card College series and a host of individual books on topics such as Stand Up Card Magic and the Art of Switching Decks. He is an accomplished performer, insightful theorist and superb communicator.

This book is billed as a sequel to his well received “Secret Agenda”, with 365 individual entries, one for each day of the calendar year. There is huge variation in style, content and length, with the contents including techniques, subtleties, tricks, presentations, ploys, practical advice, jokes, anecdotes, personal opinions, reviews, puzzles and (a new category for this book) presentational problems.

This is a highly personal collection of thoughts, ideas and observations. Most are fragments that invite the reader to reflect further, perhaps tiny bits of grit for potential pearls or “wrinkles” to improve performance. Some entries are not apparently about magic and reader reactions are likely to range from fascination to bemusement.

Roberto Giobbi is highly intelligent and sophisticated, and this book reflects an unending quest to understand and perfect magic performance– those who feel they are at a similar place in their magic career are likely to love this book. Those readers who are after new methods and tricks will probably feel it is mostly ephemeral and irrelevant.

I loved the book but perhaps found only half the entries resonated when I read them. However, such is the quality of the entries that I can imagine returning to the book in a year and finding that quite different pieces appeal.
Personal favourites included tips and outs for the classic force, most of the presentational ideas, several sets of quotes on diverse topics from “thinking” to “creativity” (there is a really useful index for the whole book), the “Imaginary Deck switch”, “most commercial items from Card College” and a psychological ploy for forcing one of a set. There were many others.

If you buy this book think carefully about how best to devour it. For me reading seven entries once a week feels right, allowing time to reflect or practice the two or three that intrigue me. I found reading just one a day often gave several days of relative disappointment, followed by too many good ideas at once!